Stop Apologizing for Your Appearance

It was one of those days. Full of plans. Many didn’t get done. Some did.

I dressed in track shorts and a t-shirt, planning to change before my evening meet-up.

After waiting 45 minutes for my son to emerge from his after-school meeting, I shot home. In less than 40 minutes, I had whipped up dinner and threw it in the oven to bake. I wiped the sweet from my forehead and headed to an hour-long appointment just a few minutes away.

I was still wearing my track shorts and t-shirt. While I had debated changing into some cute clothes for the appointment, making dinner had won the coin toss.

In my mind all my plans worked out. I expected to return home, freshen up, change into a cute outfit, and meet my friend at Panera looking calm, cool, and much better than I had all day.

Well those were my plans. And if I had been listening, I might have heard life laughing at me.

I came out of my appointment, looked at my watch, and realized I was meeting my friend in 15 minutes. The hour I thought I had to primp and change, well I had forgotten to add an hour for the hour meeting. Oppps!

I had a choice. Meet my friend wearing my track shorts or go home, change, and be late. I choose the first, but I was disappointed.

I knew she would look cute and I would look . . . like I had been running all day.

I also had another choice to make. I could worry and fret and maybe beat myself up for my lack of time awareness and planning of my day, or I could go and enjoy the time together with my friend.

I choose the later.

And while I knew I shouldn’t make a big deal about it, or draw attention to my lack of outfit planning, still, before I could slap my hand over my mouth, I was telling her hi and apologizing for my outfit and saying I had planned to wear something cute. (Probably because she was looking so cute and I didn’t want her to think I wore this 24/7).

Why do women apologize so much about their appearance? We need to love and appreciate our bodies, not apologize about them and pick them apart.Why do women apologize so much about their appearance? We need to love and appreciate our bodies, not apologize about them and pick them apart.Why do women apologize so much about their appearance? We need to love and appreciate our bodies, not apologize about them and pick them apart.Why do women apologize so much about their appearance? We need to love and appreciate our bodies, not apologize about them and pick them apart.Ladies. Do you see what I was doing?

I was apologizing for my appearance.

And it wasn’t like I was standing there in my birthday suit. Or even needed to apologize. I hadn’t shown up at Panera Bread wearing something inappropriate.

But there I was apologizing for my appearance because I had planned to wear something different. My expectations were cute outfit. Reality was gym clothes.

Quite frankly, I was embarrassed and a little upset that my expectations hadn’t turned into reality.

Did I need to apologize for my appearance?

No.

And what did apologizing for my appearance do?

Well, it put all the attention on me, and my perceived deficit.

Instead of greeting her and making her feel cute, I was asking her to make me feel better about my perceived un-cuteness.

Of course, my friend did what any friend would do, she contradicted me and said I looked fine.

Ladies. Why do we do this?

Why do we apologize for our appearance?

Why do we pull the focus on us and then wait until our friends disagree with our concerns?

Why do we feel so insecure that when we don’t meet our expectations concerning our looks, we start apologizing?

Apologizing for something that doesn’t need to be apologized for.

Because the truth is, when we apologize for our looks, rarely is it necessary or called for.

Why do women apologize so much about their appearance? We need to love and appreciate our bodies, not apologize about them and pick them apart.

Quick Question?

 

Have you ever heard a guy apologize for his appearance?

“You’ll have to excuse the stubble on my face. I didn’t shave this morning.”

“These nails? I am embarrassed to leave home with them looking like this.”

“Can you believe my hair? It just won’t behave today.”

“This shirt? Well thanks, but I should have gotten rid of it years ago.”

“Sorry my muscles are so small, I quit working out last year.”

“Can you believe my thighs in that picture? I need to quit wearing shorts.”

No. Guys don’t apologize for their appearance, pick themselves apart, and put themselves down.

 

Why do women apologize for their appearance?

 

We were created to be beautiful. And we want to be beautiful.

We like it when people notice us.

Nothing wrong with that.

Maybe part of our problem is that we have these voices in our head.

The voice that tells us we are not enough. Beautiful enough. Skinny enough. Young enough.

The voice that keeps us from jumping into the family photos because we don’t look the way we want to.

The voice that tells us what society expects us to look like and how we are failing to conform to the airbrushed women in print form.

The voice that picks apart our body, as if it is made up of pieces.

The voice that compares us to other beautiful women in real life and on social media.

The voice that wants to be accepted and part of the in-crowd.

The voice that sounds like our mean step mother who is granting no good wishes on our behalf.

The voice that focuses more on our appearance than our personality or any other aspect of us.

On and on it goes.

These voices cause us shame. To not appreciate our body. To doubt our appearance.

They cause us to apologize for our appearance:

When we run to the grocery store and bump into our boss wearing our pajama bottoms and our husband’s tee-shirt.

When people try and herd us into photos.

When we don’t look as good as we think we should.

When we are disappointed with our looks.

We apologize quickly and often for our appearance.

Why do women apologize so much about their appearance? We need to love and appreciate our bodies, not apologize about them and pick them apart.

Picking apart our looks starts early.

 

I remember entering my teens and hanging out with the other girls my age in the dressing area of the lady’s room at church. One day some girl complained about her tummy. That she needed to lose some weight. We sympathized. Told her she looked good.

But it started something.

There became this unspoken rule that we were not supposed to come in and admire ourselves in the mirror and think of ourselves as pretty. No noticing our good points aloud. Instead, we were supposed to come in and notice what was wrong with us and our clothes.

Our crocked teeth. Our short eyelashes. Our dull hair. Our freckles. Our old skirt. Our too fuzzy sweater. Our unperfect toes. Our too thick thighs.

And the sad thing was that we were all skinny. All of us beautiful teens. But we wanted to fit in, so we bemoaned our waists and talked about diets when not a one of us needed one.

We will find what we look for.

 

If our definition of appearance is perfection, we will be disappointed all our life with our looks.

If our expectation for how we should look and the reality of our appearance don’t match, then we will be unhappy with our appearance.

If we are out to find the many faults with our bodies, then that is all we will notice.

But the opposite is also true.

If we don’t base our worth on our appearance or looks, or weight, or how many times we have exercised this week, then we will be more comfortable and satisfied with our self.

If we are flexible with our expectations concerning our appearance, we will be happier and more comfortable in our skin.

If we quit comparing our self with others, we can more appreciate our good points.

If we make a point to appreciate our bodies, we will be grateful for them and notice good than bad.

If we realize our specific deficits are considered desirable by others, or know that there are others who would love to have our body, then we can be kinder to our body.

If we look at our self more as a whole, instead of body parts that need fixing and sent to the shop for a tune-up, than we will be more positive with our appearance.

If we see our self through God’s eyes we will see we are good enough, and that his love is not based on our looks.

If we stop to see our self through the eyes of our family and friends, we will see our self in a new light.  Why do women apologize so much about their appearance? We need to love and appreciate our bodies, not apologize about them and pick them apart.

Seeing our self as others see us can change our need to apologize about our looks.

 

Do you know that others see you differently than you see yourself?

When you see a picture of your family or friends, do you automatically start picking it apart? “Oh look! Her eyes are closed and her smile it to big. Don’t even get me started on how her jeans are a season old. And if she would have turned sideways a little and pulled her tummy in and her shoulder back, well then she would have looked better.”

Of course, you don’t.

And when my friend saw me in Panera Bread, she didn’t think, “Oh look, Theresa came as slob of the week in her exercise clothes. What a fraud. I bet she didn’t even exercise today. Well I know what she thinks of me. Why she didn’t even have the courtesy to dress properly and show me some respect.”

Of course, she didn’t.

Even if I think or felt like she could have been thinking this, I know she didn’t.

See that voice that I may be attributing to her, is really my voice. Not hers.

She was just happy to see me and spend some time together.

Just like I would have been happy to see her and spend time together. No matter what she was wearing. Gym clothes or dress clothes.

And that is because we have a relationship. And that relationship is more important than what we wear or look like.

So, quit hearing your voice and overlaying it on your friend or family, and thinking it is their voice. Their perceptions.

Your kids don’t look at you and see your cocked nose and to big feet. No, they see their loving mother who hugs them and feeds them and takes care of them.

Your friends don’t notice your thighs and wrinkles, they see your good qualities and how you reach out to them, bring them a dinner in hard times, and how you make them laugh.

Your husband doesn’t see your graying hair and stretch marks, he sees you as his companion. He sees your kindness and hard work radiating from your strong hands and gentle heart. He sees you as the person he couldn’t live without and who completed him.

So, do yourself a favor.

Quit badmouthing the picture others have of you in their mind.

Quit making them uncomfortable by listing what is wrong with you today in the department of your looks.

Quit apologizing for things they don’t see in you.

Instead, start seeing yourself through the eyes of those who love you. Because this is a more realistic picture of yourself. Not the one in your mind.

And while you are at it. Stop apologizing for your appearance.

I’m going to.

Let’s join together and save those apologies for necessary things.

Apologizing for our appearance is simply is not allowed anymore. We need to quit being so hard on our self (and thinking others are being hard on us too).

And when we feel the need to apologize for our appearance (which is focusing on us and what’s wrong with us), we can instead focus on the other person and compliment them or ask them a question.

And when we get a compliment, don’t apologize it away. Instead, take it and hold it, and enjoy it.

And best of all, believe it.

Why do women apologize so much about their appearance? We need to love and appreciate our bodies, not apologize about them and pick them apart.

 

Thanks for stopping by. Keep remembering what’s important.

Theresa

 

P.S. Want to read more on this topic? What if Your Body is As Good as it Gets?  by me. Dear Moms, Stop Hiding Behind the Camera, by Candace Playforth. And Are You Tired of Not Feeling Good Enough? by Laura Hicks.

 


If you need some weekly encouragement and hope, tied up with some humor? Subscribe and join the journey. Life is sweeter when we walk alongside one another.


Join the Discussion: Do you find yourself apologizing for your appearance?

Why do women apologize so much about their appearance? We need to love and appreciate our bodies, not apologize about them and pick them apart.

May link up at Holley Gerth (#coffeeforyourheart), Lori Schumaker (#Moments of Hope), Crystal Storms (#HeartEncouragement), Arabah Joy (#Grace & Truth).

Why do women apologize so much about their appearance? We need to love and appreciate our bodies, not apologize about them and pick them apart.

Why do women apologize so much about their appearance? We need to love and appreciate our bodies, not apologize about them and pick them apart.

How to Love Unconditionally: 11 Tips for Loving Yourself and Others

Unconditional love is not dependent on anything we do or don’t do. It loves us no matter what. In all circumstances and in all possibilities. It is a love that does not grow when we are good or evaporate when we displease.  It is a faithful and constant love.

This kind of love is not easy.

It is based upon a choice. Not a feeling.

When unconditionally loved, people flourish. Have freedom to be themselves. To be vulnerable. To admit their mistakes without fear.  And it gives them the desire to grow into better people.

So how can we love those around us unconditionally? As well as love our self unconditionally?

Discover 11 traits of unconditional love. Learn how to love unconditionally, both yourself and others, so that you and others can thrive in relationships.Discover 11 traits of unconditional love. Learn how to love unconditionally, both yourself and others, so that you and others can thrive in relationships.Discover 11 traits of unconditional love. Learn how to love unconditionally, both yourself and others, so that you and others can thrive in relationships.Discover 11 traits of unconditional love. Learn how to love unconditionally, both yourself and others, so that you and others can thrive in relationships.How to Love Unconditionally:

 

1. Be compassionate. Unconditional love remembers we are all flawed humans. Prone to mistakes and sinful. And because it remembers this, it is not so surprised that we have good and bad days. Good and bad traits. It doesn’t make excuses for the bad and ugly it sees in those it loves, but it has compassion for them.

2. Be patient. Unconditional love realizes that life is a journey. It knows no one has yet arrived. Nor does it expect others to have it all together. It will sit and cry with you and then encourage you to do better. It will do this over and over again, because unconditional love is patient and doesn’t demand others to be on its own time table.

3. Desire the best. Unconditional love always desires the best for the other person and it works to bring this about. It will sit for hours talking with the person to help them sort their feelings and thoughts. It listens more than it gives advice. It asks questions and helps the other person see new things, develop new ways of thinking. It sees more viewpoints than its own and is open to what is best for the person. It doesn’t act as the authority of their life and lecture or demand. It speaks the truth with kindness. The relationship is always cultivated and more important than actions and outcomes.

Discover 11 traits of unconditional love. Learn how to love unconditionally, both yourself and others, so that you and others can thrive in relationships.4. Encourage and celebrate. Unconditional love encourages, instead of competing. It celebrates small steps and victories, knowing that the big ones are few and far between (as well as a combination of many small steps). It has an attitude of “you can do it,” and “I am on your side.”

5. Doesn’t expect perfection. Unconditional love knows that perfection does not exist in any area of this life and does not expect others to demonstrate or attain perfection. It does not point out the flaws and failings first, but notices what is working and what is done well. It does not give false praise but manages to find something to be thankful for in every situation or circumstance.

6. Sees the potential. Unconditional love sees the potential in others and helps the person see their own potential too. Not that it doesn’t also see the here and now; it does. It sees the person’s flaws, but it also sees the potential and works unselfishly for the person to reach their potential.

7. Forgives easily. Unconditional love forgives easily and when asked. It doesn’t keep a tally of wrongs or bring up the past to shame or blame. It realizes we all need forgiveness and works hard not to dwell on the past. It does not extract payment for wrongs, nor does it forgive only when it has decided that someone has repented enough or is sorry enough. Unconditional love does not expect forgiveness to be earned but gives it freely as a gift.

8. Studies a person. Unconditional love wants to get to know the other person — how they tick, what motivates them, their love language, their personality, and anything else they can about the person. Because by better knowing the other person, they will understand them, be better able to motivate them, communicate with them, and ultimately love them.

Discover 11 traits of unconditional love. Learn how to love unconditionally, both yourself and others, so that you and others can thrive in relationships.Discover 11 traits of unconditional love. Learn how to love unconditionally, both yourself and others, so that you and others can thrive in relationships.9. Leads by example.  Unconditional love never expects or demands that others do something they are not willing to do them self. Their loudest preaching is by example. Unconditional love also knows that others are responsible for themselves and it does not take accountability for others who are not their responsibility.

10. Doesn’t mislabel. Unconditional love labels the behavior or action as bad, not the person as bad. It sees the difference and knows that a bad action is just a bad action. It knows that what a person chooses to do does not make that person unlovable.

11. Sets boundaries. Unconditional love knows what healthy boundaries are for itself and does not let others take advantage of them. Likewise, it knows how and when to practice tough love for the benefit of the other person.

Unconditional love is not easy.

It requires making hard choices.

But we can grow in the traits of unconditional love.

It requires laying aside our selfishness and often our first response that is wanting to pop out of our mouth.

Ultimately, unconditional love looks at how God treats us and models that behavior to others and our self.

Discover 11 traits of unconditional love. Learn how to love unconditionally, both yourself and others, so that you and others can thrive in relationships.

Thanks for stopping by. Keep remembering what’s important.

Theresa

 


If you need some weekly encouragement and hope, tied up with some humor? Subscribe and join the journey. Life is sweeter when we walk alongside one another.


Join the Discussion: What other traits does unconditional love exhibit?

Discover 11 traits of unconditional love. Learn how to love unconditionally, both yourself and others, so that you and others can thrive in relationships.May link up at Holley Gerth (#coffeeforyourheart), Lori Schumaker (#Moments of Hope), Crystal Storms (#HeartEncouragement), Arabah Joy (#Grace & Truth), Maree Dee (#Grace & Truth).

Discover 11 traits of unconditional love. Learn how to love unconditionally, both yourself and others, so that you and others can thrive in relationships.Discover 11 traits of unconditional love. Learn how to love unconditionally, both yourself and others, so that you and others can thrive in relationships.Discover 11 traits of unconditional love. Learn how to love unconditionally, both yourself and others, so that you and others can thrive in relationships.

The Secret of Unconditional Love on You and Others

Sometimes a movie inspires you and to be a change maker.

I am talking about the documentary movie about Fred Rogers Won’t You be My Neighbor.

It is well worth seeing.

And not just if you are a Mr. Rogers fan, but if you think this world needs a little more kindness. A little more love. A little more encouragement.

You will leave inspired, wanting to spread these three things a little more.

Fred Rogers had a simple message: I love you just the way you are. You are special and matter. I want to be your neighbor. Kindness and love change the world.

Nothing to complicated. But it was a radical message for kid’s television.

Still a radical message.

Most of us don’t have a Fred Rogers in our life.

How many people have told you, “I love you just the way you are?”

Probably not many. Maybe none.

How many people have you told, “I love you just the way you are?”

Unconditional love has a secret. When we feel loved and accepted just the way we already are, that's when we get motivated to change into better people.Unconditional love has a secret. When we feel loved and accepted just the way we already are, that's when we get motivated to change into better people.Unconditional love has a secret. When we feel loved and accepted just the way we already are, that's when we get motivated to change into better people.Unconditional love has a secret. When we feel loved and accepted just the way we already are, that's when we get motivated to change into better people.That doesn’t come naturally. Come on, you don’t really expect me to say that!

 

Maybe this is one reason people didn’t understand Mr. Rogers. I mean, who goes around telling imperfect little children, (who clearly are selfish, throw fits, and probably didn’t even eat all of their breakfast cheerfully) that they are loved just the way they are?

Besides Fred Rogers?

Don’t these children need a life of striving and improving and growing before they are getting even half way close to becoming something worth writing home about?

What accomplishments do they have to their name?

How are they better than everyone else?

What special gifts or talents are they using to change the world?

What awards and contests have they won?

Right now, they are dependent on their parents for everything. They are not bringing in any income, cleaning their messes, or leading a support group.

And if those children are told that they are loved and special just the way they are, won’t that make them want to sit down and quit trying? Quit growing? Stop changing? Because we all know, children are far from perfect, no matter where they are in their growth spurt. Big or little. Tall or short.

If there is one thing that children need, it is improvement.

Unconditional love has a secret. When we feel loved and accepted just the way we already are, that's when we get motivated to change into better people.Loving Unconditionally. Why this message is important.

 

If you watch the movie, you will notice the deep connection Mr. Rogers has with children. He gets on their level right away. In a few sentences he gains their trust. Children tell him things they would not tell other adults. Scary things. Funny things. Hard things. Emotional things.

He listens. Acknowledges them and their feelings. The children leave lighter.

His message is simple. You are loved, and you matter.

Isn’t that what we all want? To be loved and to know we matter to someone.

We want to be acknowledged. To know someone sees us and loves us.

Mr. Rogers helps the children feel this.

He explains big scary things like death, divorce, anger, and controlling our emotions using simple words. He encourages us that we can do hard things, like discuss our fears. He reminds us we count right now. Just the way we are.

Acceptance and love ooze from him. And the audience of kids soak it up.

We all want to be accepted. Loved. Right now. Without jumping through hoops or doing complicated things. Or waiting to grow up.

Unconditional love has a secret. When we feel loved and accepted just the way we already are, that's when we get motivated to change into better people.Unconditional love defined. What does I love your just the way you are mean?   

 

Towards the end of the show, Mr. Rogers is giving a commencement speech and he tells the audience that people have asked him what he means when he says, “I love you just the way you are.”

He said it means you don’t have to earn it. You are loved without making your bed. You are loved during your bad day. You are loved without accomplishing anything and before doing anything.

Wow! Who doesn’t want to be loved without having to earn it? Without doing and accomplishing?

Wouldn’t you savor being loved:

When you first wake up and haven’t even gotten dressed.

In the middle of your mistake riddled and emotional rollercoaster day

While your boss is telling you all the improvements you need to make.

In the middle of your temper tantrum.

When your house is a mess and the clothes you are wearing are dirty.

When your kids are screaming, the dog is digging up your flower bed, and your neighbor is not mincing words about your cat attacking his cat.

When nothing on your to-do list is crossed off at the end of the day.

When you feel to tired to even try to get out of bed, try to be cheerful, or live a good life.

When you are at your worst. Your dirtiest. Your lowest point. Your most unlovable period.

Yes! We all would.

We all have our hand in the air asking for this kind of unconditional love. This love that is not dependent on us. Our actions. Our doing. Our emotions. Our accomplishments. Our striving. Our earning. Our age or health. Our future or past.

Did you get that?

This kind of love is unconditional love. It is not dependent on anything we do or don’t do. Unconditional love loves us no matter what. It loves us in all circumstances and possibilities. It doesn’t suddenly evaporate or grow because of anything we do.

Unconditional love. This is what we as adults. We as children. We as humans desire. Crave. Thrive under.

But this kind of love is rare. Hard to exhibit. Hard to understand.

Unconditional love has a secret. When we feel loved and accepted just the way we already are, that's when we get motivated to change into better people.Conditional love versus unconditional love. Why we feel nervous saying this to others.

 

We grow up nervously trying to please others. Forming our self into something acceptable and wanted. We strive and earn. We accomplish and do, so we can accept our self and so others will accept us.

We compare. Tweak our self a little.

Judge others. Tweak our self a little more.

Compete in the game of life. And tweak our self a little more.

We all know that no one is perfect. That no one has yet arrived and is the best they can be.

That everyone has room for growing and changing.

And we take all these ideas and apply them to love.

People need to earn our love, we think. They need to do something for us to love them more.

Maybe not at first, because we love a baby just because it is ours, but soon we expect more.

We tell our kid we love them when they bring home an A. Hit a baseball out of the diamond. Make us proud. Win an award. Do their chores. Delight us in some way.

We tell our mate we love them when they remember our birthday. When we feel loving towards them. When they clean the kitchen. During that sunset stroll on the beach.

We don’t want to have conditional love, but so often our love is conditional.

And one very hard thing for us to say to those we love, is, “I love you just the way you are.”

Yup. Right now. Right here.

And what’s often harder still, is saying that to our self.

Have you ever looked yourself in the mirror and said those words to yourself and believed them?

The rub is this. These words are probably hard to say because we see a good number of imperfections of the person we would say this to. Yes, we love the person, but we also see and know many of their imperfections, flaws, and areas they need some improvements in.

And when we say, “I love you just the way you are,” we think we are saying to the other person that they are perfect. Have arrived in life. Can sit back and stop growing or trying.

The reality though, is that we are not saying they are perfect. We are saying, “I love you as the flawed human you are. You don’t need to jump through hoops to earn my love. Because my love is not dependent on what you do. My love is dependent on who you are. On your worth as a human. A child of God.”

You are saying, “I accept you and love you flaws and all.”

“My love does not waver and come and go. My love is unconditional.”

You are saying, “You don’t need to take a shower, read a self-help book, solve your fears, heal your anger, get dressed out of yoga pants, or put makeup on for me to love you. I accept you the way you are.”

Unconditional love has a secret. When we feel loved and accepted just the way we already are, that's when we get motivated to change into better people.If I say I love you unconditionally, will the other person know what I am saying?

 

Try it.

Tell your child, mate, or friend, that you love them just the way they are.

See what happens.

When we feel secure in the love someone has for us, we are more vulnerable. We quit pretending and act more like our self. We want to try harder and do better. We release a huge sigh of relief. We feel inspired to do more and accomplish more. We quit hiding the true us.

Put away your fears. The last thing we do is sit down and think we have arrived and are now perfectly content to do nothing for the rest of our life in the manner of improving our self or growing.

Because we as humans, and from a very early age, know we are not perfect. We know that we have improving and work to do on our self. Our most recent mistakes spring to mind. Our flaws and self-doubts fill our mind.

Listen. Someone is already saying I love you unconditionally to you.

 

Do you know that someone already loves you unconditionally?

Without that shower and with your morning breath.

With all your flaws. Your lack of new achievements. Even with your bad attitude that is still hanging on from yesterday.

He loves you just the way you are. Right now.

Even with your messy desk, rough patches of skin, and lack of matching socks.

You don’t need to change yourself to get his love. His acceptance. His help. His grace.

You don’t need to try harder, mold yourself into good enough, or try to earn his love.

His love is not something you earn. It is a free gift. Freely given.

God loves you just the way you are right now. You don’t have to do anything to earn his love. You don’t have to produce and do to have the right to be allowed some of his love.

His love is unconditional.

His love is waiting for you. Just receive it.

Unconditional love has a secret. When we feel loved and accepted just the way we already are, that's when we get motivated to change into better people.Loving someone unconditionally. Now Pass it On  

 

If someone said, “I love you just the way you are,” what would you say? Feel?

How could it change your life a little?

And what if you said it to those around you? How would it change their lives? Your relationships with them?

Try it.

It doesn’t have to be there exact words. But something like it.

See what happens. How the person responds.

Then do it again and again until they begin to realize you mean it. That you love them unconditionally. That they don’t have to earn your love.  Or change to get your love.

Say it until they believe you love them faults and all. Bad traits and all. Horrible day and all. Quirky smile and all. Unsightly toes and all. Plus, all their wonderful and charming personality and bits thrown in. You love them kit and caboodle.

And while you are at it. Say it to yourself. And mean it. Now say it again. Again. Replace those lies and critical tracks playing in your mind with the truth.

Listen and hear God saying to you every day.  Because he is. His unconditional love is a daily gift. Always renewed. Always available.

Now pass it on to those around you.

When we feel loved, truly loved, we don’t sit down and stop growing. No, we grow in ways we can’t even imagine.

Unconditional love has a secret. When we feel loved and accepted just the way we already are, that's when we get motivated to change into better people.

Thanks for stopping by. Keep remembering what’s important.

Theresa

 

P.S. Lesley writes about what it looks like to Live Loved!   And Kaitlyn Bouchillon talks about a very moving scene from Won’t You Be My Neighbor? at (in)courage.


If you need some weekly encouragement and hope, tied up with some humor? Subscribe and join the journey. Life is sweeter when we walk alongside one another.


Join the Discussion: What are your thoughts on unconditional love?

Unconditional love has a secret. When we feel loved and accepted just the way we already are, that's when we get motivated to change into better people.May link up at Holley Gerth (#coffeeforyourheart), Lori Schumaker (#Moments of Hope), Crystal Storms (#HeartEncouragement), Arabah Joy (#Grace & Truth).

Unconditional love has a secret. When we feel loved and accepted just the way we already are, that's when we get motivated to change into better people.Unconditional love has a secret. When we feel loved and accepted just the way we already are, that's when we get motivated to change into better people.